RESOURCES

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RECOGNISED BIOSECURITY GROUPS

Recognised by the Minister for Agriculture and supported by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), a RBG provides the opportunity for shared responsibility and community led and co-ordinated control of declared pests.  
Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act), all landholders are responsible for managing declared pests on their own land. 

REPORTING PESTS

All landholders are encouraged to keep an eye out for signs of wild dogs, feral pigs, or any other declared pest. Report directly to the MBG or the FeralScan reporting app.  These reports are vital to direct the activities and accuracy of the Licensed Pest Management Technicians (LPMT).


Every time activity is reported through FeralScan in the Midlands region, the MBG team receives an alert, which can then be acted upon.


Contact the MBG on 0409 889 501 or eo@mbg.org.au. You can also download the FeralScan app or visit the website to report any sightings. 

RESTRICTED CHEMICAL PERMITS

Restricted Chemical Product (RCP) Permits are required for landholders to possess and use registered 1080 or strychnine products for vertebrate animal control on leasehold or freehold land. Use of 1080 and strychnine is restricted by law and confined to certain areas of the state. Before using 1080 or strychnine you need to complete appropriate training, ensure you comply with relevant Acts, Regulations and Legislation, and must apply for and obtain the appropriate permit(s) to purchase these chemicals. Information about this is found in the documents below:

USING RESTRICTED CHEMICALS

Restricted Chemical Product (RCP) Permits are required for landholders to possess and use registered 1080 or strychnine products for vertebrate animal control on leasehold or freehold land. Use of 1080 and strychnine is restricted by law and confined to certain areas of the state. Before using 1080 or strychnine you need to complete appropriate training, ensure you comply with relevant Acts, Regulations and Legislation, and must apply for and obtain the appropriate permit(s) to purchase these chemicals. Information about this is found in the documents below:

Paddock Chat | A West Midlands Group Original Podcast

PODCAST | PEST MANAGEMENT STARTS AT HOME

In this episode, the West Midlands Group caught up with Chris O’Callaghan and Jim Miller to chat about how the Midlands Biosecurity Group is tackling wild dogs in our region. Our conversation was recorded in mid-April and due to restrictions in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19, this interview was recorded via Zoom so the audio quality isn’t amazing. We do talk about the extermination of feral pests so if you don’t want to hear about the nitty-gritty of animal control, maybe skip this one. USEFUL LINKS: Visit www.mbg.org.au for more information about pest control in the Midlands region. You can contact the West Midlands Group via www.wmgroup.org.au or email us on comms@wmgroup.org.au. 

WILD DOGS

Wild dog predation on livestock is taking a heavy economic and emotional toll on livestock producers in affected pastoral and agricultural areas. 

Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 landholders - landowners and occupiers - are responsible for wild dog control on their own land. However, for vertebrate animal pest control, everyone must ensure they use the most humane method available.

There are a number of control options available, including ground and aerial baiting with meat poisoned with 1080 (sodium fluoroacetate)canid pest ejectorstrapping using strychninefencing and to a lesser extent, trapping and shooting.

FERAL PIGS

Feral pigs directly affect agriculture by feeding on crops and livestock, causing damage by rooting and trampling, and by harbouring and spreading diseases and parasites. Damage tends to be local but the overall costs to agricultural production in Australia were conservatively estimated in 1996 at around $100 million per year.

Pigs are not native to Australia. Domestic pigs were often allowed to range freely to forage for food in the bush and some inevitably became feral, living and breeding in the wild. Accidental or deliberate introductions of domestic pigs into the wild continue even today.

RED FOX

Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are opportunistic predators and scavengers and have few natural predators in Australia. Red foxes pose a threat to livestock, as they prey on poultry, lambs and goat kids. In high density areas they may also be a health risk to humans and pets, through transmission of diseases.
Evidence suggests red foxes are a primary cause in the decline and extinction of many small and medium-sized rodent and marsupial species in Australia. They also prey on many bird species.
Foxes were originally introduced to mainland Australia in the 1850s for recreational hunting and spread rapidly. Today, they are abundant in all states and territories except Tasmania, where they are still at low density.

EUROPEAN RABBIT

European rabbits are Australia’s most widespread and destructive environmental and agricultural vertebrate pest.
First arriving in Australia with the First Fleet, then deliberately released for hunting in the 1800’s, the rate of spread of the rabbit in Australia was the fastest of any colonising mammal anywhere in the world. They are now found in all states and territories, including several offshore islands.
Rabbits graze on native and introduced vegetation, crops and pastures. Rabbit grazing can prevent seedlings from regenerating and reduce crop yields, as well as increase competition for feed with livestock. Rabbits damage native plants and directly compete with native wildlife for food and shelter. Their digging and browsing leads to a loss of vegetation cover, which in turn can result in slope instability and soil erosion.
There are at least 304 Australian threatened species that may be adversely affected by competition and land degradation by rabbits.

MBG NEWSLETTER

Biosecurity Bites

MBG NEWSLETTER EDITION 5 - JULY 2020

MBG NEWSLETTER EDITION 3 - APRIL 2020

MBG NEWSLETTER EDITION 1 - FEBRUARY 2020

MBG NEWSLETTER EDITION 4 - MAY 2020

MBG NEWSLETTER EDITION 2 - MARCH 2020

Midlands Biosecurity Group

08 9651 4008

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